Spring 2014 Center Hours

Welcome to a new semester at UIUC! The Rhetoric Tutoring Center is a free service available to any student currently enrolled in a RHET course who would like to talk about their writing. Our hours are as follows:

Mondays: 9:00am – 2:00pm, 5:00pm – 8:00pm
Tuesdays: 9:30am – 2:30pm
Wednesday: 9:00am – 12:00pm, 1:30pm – 3pm, 5:00pm – 8:00pm
Thursdays: 9:30am – 2:30pm
Fridays: 9:00am – 6:00pm

Click here to book an appointment. You can find us in the English Building in room 241. (Click here for a map of the building.) Questions? Email us at rhetoric.tutors@gmail.com. We look forward to working with you!

- Debojoy, Isabel, Elizabeth and Noel

Semester’s End

This week is our last here at the center before we all go off for final exams and then some much-deserved holiday respite. We have a few openings still available this week; check out the appointment scheduler. The center will be closed from December 14th, 2013 through January 20th, 2014.

We’ll be back the first day of spring instruction—Tuesday, January 21st, 2014—with some new members in our crew.  We’d like to send out a hearty welcome to Noel and Isabel, who will be joining Debojoy and Elizabeth at the Center this spring. Many thanks to Jon for the great work on those long Tuesdays with our rhetoric students.

We look forward to working with you in the new year!
– Debojoy, Elizabeth, Isabel and Noel

Fall 2013 Center Hours

Welcome to a new semester at UIUC! The Rhetoric Tutoring Center is a free service available to any student currently enrolled in a RHET course who would like to talk about their writing. Our hours are as follows:

Mondays: 9:00am – 3:00pm
Tuesdays: 9:00am – 5:00pm
Wednesday: 9:00am – 4:00pm
Fridays: 11:00am – 3:00pm

Click here to book an appointment. You can find us in the English Building in room 241. (Click here for a map of the building.) Questions? Email us at rhetoric.tutors@gmail.com. Cheers!

- Debojoy, Elizabeth and Jon

Welcome to Spring Semester 2013!

Hey there! 

The Rhetoric Tutoring Center is officially open for the semester, with the following hours:

Mondays: 11:00 am -1:00pm, 2:00pm – 4:00 pm

Wednesdays: 11:00 am — 2:00pm 

Thursdays: 2:00 pm — 5:00pm 

My name is Pam Saunders, and this semester I’ll be serving as the Rhetoric tutor. I look forward to working with you! 

-PS

 

New Rhetoric Tutoring Center Hours

The Rhetoric Tutoring Center will have new hours beginning on Monday, Oct. 15.  The new hours will allow the Center to be open during times there are high demands for tutorials:

Mondays: 9 AM to 1 PM

Wednesdays: 9 AM to 12 noon

Thursdays: 9 AM to 12 noon

As always, you may submit essays for Feedback-by-Email or ask Quick Questions!

Quick Question: Citing an Excerpt of Another Book in a Text

On Sept. 23, an undergraduate writer asked this Question Question: “How do you cite an excerpt from a book within my English book?”

There are two answers to this question, depending on what is meant by “excerpt.”  I take “excerpt” to mean one of two things:

  1. A brief passage of text that the textbook editors quote or
  2. An entire work (or part of a work) that is anthologized in the textbook.

So, assuming you are using MLA documentation, here are the two answers:

A passage quoted in the textbook: If you are quoting a passage of text that the textbook editors quote, Diana Hacker’s Research and Documentation Online specifies the following: “When a writer’s or a speaker’s quoted words appear in a source written by someone else, begin the parenthetical citation with the abbreviation ‘qtd. in.’”

For example: “Researchers Botan and McCreadie point out that ‘workers are objects of information collection without participating in the process of exchanging the information’ (qtd. in Kizza and Ssanyu 14).”

On the Works Cited page, then, you simply include an entry for the textbook.

A work anthologized in a textbook: If, on the other hand, you are quoting an entire work (or a selection of a work) that is included in your textbook or reader, the in-text citation will simply use the author of the selection’s name, looking something like this: (Shulman 372).

The Works Cited entry would look like this:

Shulman, Max. “Love Is a Fallacy.” Current Issues and Enduring Questions. Ed. Sylvan Barnet and Hugo Bedau. 8th ed. Boston: Bedford, 2008. 371-79. Print.

For answers to your other Quick Questions, click here.  To find out more about MLA Documentation, visit Diana Hacker’s Research and Documentation Online.